Friday, April 10, 2015

Out of Alberta - the Details

I am a 'multiples maker' - in other words, when I get a pattern all worked out I like to make it again, and again, and again.  So it was no surprise that it should happen when working on my Tina Givens Collection for the Artisans Square 2015 SWAP (sewing with a plan) as you can see from my last post!

I had a lot of fun with details, and wanted to talk more about them, and the actual patterns.  The instructions that come with TG patterns, are quite different than the instructions that you would get with the Big 4.  Two pages, letter/A4 sized, a few pictures and some written instructions.  They are adequate, but there may be some head scratching if you are new to this sewing game.  But fear not - there is always Google!  So what did I do and what did I change?  I rather liked the cute patchwork detail - but not your Grannies patchwork - where random fabric scraps are added to your garments:




In comparison to the details on TG clothes, this is ultra conservative, but for me this is wildly way out there!!  As the clothes get washed then the edges will ruffle and fray a bit more adding character.

As you can also see from these pics, I have also top and edge-stitched pretty much all the seams.  I like the strength it adds as well as a kind of utilitarian tidiness.

Next up was the neckline and arm opening.  I started using my usual smart finish - no raw edges, like this:


I used to find that binding made the edges gap outwards, and so I changed the way I attached the binding and this is what works for me.  I cut my own binding using a rotary cutter at 1.25" wide.  I then feed it through my bias binder making thingy and I find that the extra 1/4" means that the binding meets nicely in the centre.  I sew the binding to the top from the inside (so the right side of the binding is sewn to the wrong side arm/neckline, stretching the binding a little as I sew it on.  I then flip it ALL to the right side of the garment and sew it down using a edge foot that keeps my stitching nice and tidy.

Miss TG applies her binding like this:



So I tried it too!  Same width binding, folded in half and pressed, then sewed it to the raw edges from the right side - top and edge-stitching (do you see the pattern?  I will try the raw edge finishes but don't take away my top stitching!)  As the garment gets washed, the bindings will fray and ruffle.  I am hoping that I did not sew too close to the edge and that the binding will stay put!

Another detail I utilized was adding a few buttons to my Kika dress:


You may recognize this finish and you get top marks if you recognized it from Colette's Sorbetto as seen here.

I know a lot of people would shy away from this kind of design due to the thin fabrics, wide and uneven hems.  If you have a serger, the chances are that you can do a rolled hem like I did:



Just how quick and easy is that?  I rolled the hems on the pieces before serging the side seams so that I did not need to 'roll' over a seam.  I think that the finish looks pretty good.  And yes, I have to match my serger thread!!

So there you have it - a few details that would have mde the previous post waaaaay too long!  I hope that there was something there that you found useful.  What are your favorite details that you use with your sewing?  Do tell!!

12 comments :

  1. Love the details. Your binding is so neat.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I cheat and use an edging foot - it makes ALL the difference :)

      Delete
  2. I like your 'wildly out there' patchwork details!.
    Like you, I top stitch everything -I hate it when facings roll out. I also like rolling hems of lighter fabrics on the serger (I think we have the same one) then doing the side /back seams. I will often add a bit of stitching just inside/above the rolled hem on the seam areas to keep everything flat.
    "Out of Alberta"! :) I love it and you look great.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks - mines a Janome (644 I think) and I hear what you say about the side seams. On the more recent tops I've caught the rolled hems in the side seam top-stitching. Wow, what a difference that makes to neatness!

      Delete
  3. I'm going to have to look these patterns up- I'm loving the glimpses you've shared.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I love them. They really are a difference type of esthetic, and I still find that you need to 'fit' certain areas, but they are such fun to make. Go and try it - you know you want to!

      Delete
  4. Thank you...it is very helpful information!!!

    ReplyDelete
  5. Love the patches that you added.. Such fun patterns..

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It was fun adding the patches - definitely out of my comfort zone . . . but now I rather like them and want to do more!

      Delete
  6. I love this new 'collection'. It is very you and the little details are fab.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank-you! It's funny really as I didn't realise how 'me' this esthetic was until I'd made a couple of pieces, and that was that. I'm hooked!

      Delete

Thank-you for taking the time out to leave a comment - it is much appreciated!